Astronomical Society

of Long Island

 

NOTICE:  All content on this site is Copyright ©2016 by Ken Spencer, The Astronomical Society of Long Island, and the respective photographers.  All Rights Reserved.  Reproduction is forbidden without express written permission.







PROGRAMS FOR AUGUST 2019.


Aug 21   Solstice Party, More or Less.  We couldn’t decide whether or not to call this the “Solstice Party” two months late, or the Equinox Party, one month early!  But you know the drill - bring munchies, either healthy or “guilty pleasures” and desserts, and something to drink, and be prepared to visit with fellow ASLI members.


August 28 - Observing, dark sky.  We hope to have clear skies for a regular dark sky observing session.  Bring your own telescopes and binoculars, or look through all the telescopes we bring and set up on the observing field.


PROGRAMS FOR SEPTEMBER 2019


Sept 4  - Observing, dark sky.  We hope to have clear skies for a regular dark sky observing session.  Bring your own telescopes and binoculars, or look through all the telescopes we bring and set up on the observing field.


Sept 11 - Next Generation of Optical Coatings - Tony Pirera.  Tony will talk about modern optical coatings used in professional observatories and for the Space Program.


Sept 18 - Club Annual Elections.  Come vote in support of the current officers, and members of the Board of Directors.  Or, come “Throw the bums out.”  It is your choice - make a careful decision...   :-)


Sept 25 - Observing, dark sky.  We hope to have clear skies for a regular dark sky observing session.  Bring your own telescopes and binoculars, or look through all the telescopes we bring and set up on the observing field.

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NGC 4216 in the Virgo Cluster by Dave Barnett





















Our intrepid astrophotographer Dave Barnett apparently needs no sleep at all, judging by his latest handiwork.  In the center of the frame is the galaxy NGC 4216 in the Virgo Cluster.  It is 40 million light-years distant, and is an edge-on spiral galaxy.  It is nearly 100,000 light-years across, about the size of our own Milky Way galaxy.  It is flanked by fellow Virgo cluster member NGC 4222.  If you are thinking of trying astrophotography, you should know this is not a simple trick.  He used an 8” f/4 Newtonian, and this final image is a stack of 4 minute long sub exposures with a total time of 92 minutes.