Astronomical Society

of Long Island

 

NOTICE:  All content on this site is Copyright ©2016 by Ken Spencer, The Astronomical Society of Long Island, and the respective photographers.  All Rights Reserved.  Reproduction is forbidden without express written permission.




PROGRAMS FOR SEPTEMBER 2018




Sep 5 - First Observing Session - We will observe only if the skies are clear. Bring our own telescope or binoculars, or come and observe through our instruments. New Moon is Sept. 9th. Do Not park on the lawn, 


Sep 12. Observing Night. We will observe only if the skies are clear. Bring our own telescope or binoculars, or come and observe through our instruments. New Moon Sept 9th. Do Not park on the lawn, 


Sep 19 - Eyepiece Strategy - by Ed Anderson.  I started in astronomy with 10X50 binoculars, then added an 80 mm short tube refractor on a GoTo mount. That was enough to know I was committed to astronomy and the buying began. I have since added an 8” Dob and a  5” Mak. My eyepieces were acquired in a haphazard way with no plan. I now have a plan and am aligning my eyepiece collection to that plan. The purpose of this discussion is to share what I have learned about building an eyepiece set and then to share the strategy I am currently following. This is not specific to any scope or any brand or type of eyepiece. My approach may not be right for you but it may help you organize your thoughts and help you develop your own strategy. When I do calculations I am going to use my main scope, my Orion XT8i as the example. You can substitute in your own scope’s focal length to get the magnifications involved. And use your aperture to estimate a reasonable maximum high magnification. There is nothing magic about what I will outline, it just creates a framework for planning.


Sep 26 - ASLI Elections.  Please come and vote for the officers and board members who will represent you in the coming year.


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NGC 4216 in the Virgo Cluster by Dave Barnett





















Our intrepid astrophotographer Dave Barnett apparently needs no sleep at all, judging by his latest handiwork.  In the center of the frame is the galaxy NGC 4216 in the Virgo Cluster.  It is 40 million light-years distant, and is an edge-on spiral galaxy.  It is nearly 100,000 light-years across, about the size of our own Milky Way galaxy.  It is flanked by fellow Virgo cluster member NGC 4222.  If you are thinking of trying astrophotography, you should know this is not a simple trick.  He used an 8” f/4 Newtonian, and this final image is a stack of 4 minute long sub exposures with a total time of 92 minutes.